Dr. Patricia Moseley Stanford

Pilgrim Biographies

Compiled from various sources by the Historian, Society of Mayflower Descendants in the state of Arizona, 1989.

 John
Alden

 Isaac Allerton

 John Billington

 William Bradford

 William Brewster

 Peter
Brown

 James Chilton

 Francis Cooke

 Edward
Doty

 Francis
Eaton

 Edward Fuller

 Samuel
Fuller

 Stephen Hopkins

 John Howland

 Richard
More

 William Mullins

 Degory
Priest

 Thomas Rogers

 Henry Samson

 George Soule

 Myles Standish

 Richard Warren

 William White

 Edward Winslow


John Alden

John Alden was born in England about 1599, but nothing has been conclusively established concerning his ancestry or exact location of birth. He was a cooper by trade and hired on as a "Mayflower" crew member in that capacity at Southampton. The conditions of employment permitted him to either remain in America or return as a crew member to England. He chose the former course of action after arrival in the New World. He was one of the fortyone signers of the Mayflower Compact.

On 12 May 1622 John Alden married Priscilla Mullins. Her parents had died in the general sickness of that first winter at Plymouth.

About 1632 they moved to nearby Duxbury. In 1653 they moved into a second house which is still standing (105 Alden Street) and maintained by the Alden Kindred of America, Inc. An excavation in 1960 revealed the location of the original house, about 300 yards away.

John Alden served in many public service capacities over the years, including assistant to the Governor and twice as Deputy Governor.

John and Priscilla had eleven children. Descent from John Alden has been proven through eight of them: Elizabeth, John, Joseph, Rebecca, Ruth, Sarah, Jonathan, and David. Little is known about the other children, Priscilla, Zachariah, and Mary.

It is not known when Priscilla died, but perhaps she was still living as of 1680. John died on September 22, 1687, the last of those who signed the historic Mayflower Compact.

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Isaac Allerton

Isaac Allerton was born in England about 1586, but nothing has been conclusively established concerning his ancestry or the exact location of his birth. He was a tailor in London before joining the Separatist group at Leyden, Holland. In Holland he married Mary Norris of Newbury, England on 4 November 1611. With his wife and children, Bartholomew, Remember, and Mary, he embarked from Holland on the "Speedwell" and transferred to the "Mayflower" at Southampton.

Isaac Allerton was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact.

Isaac Allerton's wife, Mary, died at Plymouth on 25 February 1620-1 during the general sickness that befell the Pilgrims that first winter. He then married Fear Brewster, daughter of William Brewster, before 22 May 1627. She died 12 December 1634 after they had two children, Sarah and Isaac. He was married a third time, before 1644, to Joanna Swinnerton.

Isaac Allerton served as an Assistant Governor from 1621 to 1631, and as a business representative of the Colony, making several trips to London in that capacity. He was dismissed after being accused of extravagance and mixing private trading with public interests. He moved to Marblehead about 1633 and operated a coastal trading fleet for a time before moving to New Amsterdam where he resided for ten years. He finally located at New Haven. He was a trader at both locations.

Isaac Allerton died in February 1658-9. Descent from him has been proven through two children of his first marriage, Remember and Mary, and one child of his second marriage, Isaac. His oldest son, Bartholomew, lived in England, had four children, and died there.

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John Billington

John Billington was born in England about 1580, but nothing has been conclusively established concerning his ancestry or exact location of birth. He married Elinor before 1605. They and their two sons, John and Francis, boarded the Mayflower at London or Southampton.

He was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact.

However, he was resentful of authority and in 1621 was punished for insubordination, having refused to obey a command given by Capt. Myles Standish. In 1630 he was executed after being found "guilty of willful murder", according to William Bradford's account, of John Newcomen. Elinor married Gregory Armstrong in 1638.

Descent from John Billington has been proven only through son Francis.

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William Bradford

William Bradford, son of William and Alice (Hanson) Bradford, was baptized on 19 March 1589 at Austerfield, Yorkshire, England. He joined the Separatist group at the age of 17 and went to Holland when that group fled from England. He married Dorothy May at Amsterdam on 10 December 1613, by whom he had one child. This child was left in Holland when William and Dorothy embarked on the SPEEDWELL and transferred to the MAYFLOWER at Southampton.

William was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact, his name appearing second on the list, after John Carver.

Dorothy May Bradford drowned in Cape Cod Harbor on 7 December 1620, an event which has never been authentically explained.

William served as Governor of Plymouth Colony from 1621 until 1657, with the exception of five years. From 1630 to 1650 he wrote the famous History of Plimoth Plantation.

William married widow Alice (Carpenter) Southworth on 14 August 1623 shortly after she arrived at Plymouth on the ANNE. By this marriage there were three children. Descent from William Bradford has been proven through only two of his children, William and Joseph.

William Bradford died on 19 May 1657. His will and inventory of estate are on record at Plymouth. Alice died in April 1670.

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William Brewster

William Brewster was born in England about 1567, probably in Nottinghamshire or Yorkshire. His father, also named William, became bailiff of Scrooby Manor in 1575, and in 1588 was made postmaster. The younger William attended Cambridge University 1580-83 but did not stay to graduate. He married about 1589. His wife's name was Mary.

In 1590 William Brewster assumed the responsibilities formerly carried by his father, but in the following years became involved with leadership of the Separatist movement and ultimately was instrumental in the migration of the Scrooby group to Holland. There he became the ruling Elder of their new church, a teacher of English, and a publisher of religious books.

With others William Brewster helped organize the emigration of the Separatists (Pilgrims) from Holland to America in 1620. Brewster joined the group on the MAYFLOWER at Southampton. His wife and two of their children (Love and Wrestling) were on the SPEEDWELL from Holland to England. A son, Jonathan, came to America on the FORTUNE in 1621, and daughters Patience and Fear came on the ANNE in 1623.

Descent from William Brewster has been proven through all of the above named children except Wrestling.

William Brewster was one of the 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact.

Although not a minister in the Pilgrim sense, William Brewster became the true leader of the church at Plymouth and was greatly respected for his wisdom and fairness of judgment. He died on 10 April 1644. Inventory of his estate is on record at Plymouth. He did not leave a will. His wife Mary died in 1627.

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Peter Brown

Peter Brown was born in England, perhaps about 1600, but nothing has been established concerning his ancestry or exact location of birth. He seems to have been a carpenter. He joined the Pilgrim group at Southampton, sailing on the Mayflower.

He was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. In 1624 or 1625 he married widow Martha (?) Ford, who came over on the Fortune in 1621. She died in 1627 and he remarried, but only this wife's given name, Mary, is known, and she died after 21 November 1633. There were two children by each marriage, but descent from Peter Brown has been proven through only daughter Mary (of the first marriage) and Rebecca (of the second marriage).

Peter moved to nearby Duxbury soon after that community was established. He died in 1633. He did not leave a will but an inventory of his estate is on record at Plymouth.

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James Chilton


James Chilton was born before 1563 in Canterbury, Kent, England, the son of Lyonell Chilton. James became a tailor. He married before 1587 and had ten children. His wife's name was possibly Susanna Furner.

It is believed that this family was part of the Pilgrim group that resided in Leyden, Holland. However, of this family, only James, his wife, and youngest daughter, Mary, came to America on the MAYFLOWER. The eldest daughter, Isabella, came to Plymouth about 1629 with her husband, Roger Chandler. The youngest daughter, Mary, was the first lady to come ashore from the MAYFLOWER. Her granddaughter, Ann Winslow, at age 92, told her own grandson in 1769 that Mary's "curiosity of being first on the American Strand prompted her, like a young heroine, to leap out of the boat and wade ashore. She was a twelve year old at the time."

James Chilton was one of the 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact, but he died on 18 December 1620 while the ship was still anchored off Cape Cod. His wife died sometime after 21 January 1621 during the general sickness which occurred that winter.

Descent from James Chilton has been proven through only his two daughters, Isabella and Mary.

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Francis Cooke

It is believed that Francis Cooke was born in England after August 1583, but nothing has been conclusively established concerning his ancestry or the exact location of his birth. It is known that he married Hester Mahieu (from Canterbury, England) at Leyden, Holland on 4 July 1603.

Francis Cooke was one of the Pilgrim group that embarked from Holland on the SPEEDWELL and transferred to the MAYFLOWER at Southampton. He left his wife and three of his children, Jane, Jacob, and Hester, but was accompanied by his eldest son, John. Hester, his wife, and the other children came over on the ANNE in 1623. One more child, Mary, was born at Plymouth. Descent from Francis Cooke has been proven through all five children.

Francis Cooke was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. He died at Plymouth 7 April 1663. His will and inventory of his estate are on record at Plymouth. Hester, his wife, died after 8 June 1666.

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Edward Doty

It is believed that Edward Doty was born in England, perhaps about 1600, but nothing has been conclusively established concerning his ancestry or exact location of birth. He came aboard the Mayflower before it sailed from London, and was listed as a "servant" of Stephen Hopkins.

He was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact.

Bradford's History of Plimoth Plantation clearly indicates that Edward had a previous wife before he married Faith Clark, daughter of Tristram Clark, 6 January 1643 at Plymouth; and by this second wife it is known that he had nine children. Faith came to Plymouth with her father on the Francis in 1634.

Edward was often in court either as plaintiff or complainant in civil cases, and in June 1621 he received a sentence for breach of peace when he and Edward Leister fought a duel with cutlasses. He owned property in Yarmouth, Cohasset, and Dartmouth in addition to the land where he lived in Plymouth.

Edward died 23 August 1655 and his wife then married John Phillips. Edward's will and inventory of estate are on record at Plymouth.

Descent from Edward Doty has been proven through all nine of his children.

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Francis Eaton

It is believed that Francis Eaton, a carpenter, was one of the London contingent who boarded the "Mayflower" at Southampton. He was accompanied by his wife, Sarah, and an infant son, Samuel. The ancestry of Francis and Sarah, and place of origin, is unknown.

He was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact.

Sarah died during the general sickness of the first winter at Plymouth. Francis subsequently married Mrs. Carver's maid, name unknown, but she died shortly thereafter. He married again in 1624 or 1625, this third wife being Christian Penn who had come over on the "Anne" in 1623. By her he had three children: Rachel, Benjamin, and one whose name is unknown.

Francis died during an epidemic in 1633. He lef t no will, but an inventory of his estate listed tools of his trade. His third wife subsequently married another "Mayflower" passenger, Francis Billington, and died in Middleborough, MA about 1684.

Descent from Francis Eaton has been proven through sons, Samuel and Benjamin, and daughter, Rachel.

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Edward Fuller

Edward Fuller was born in England at Redenhall Parish, County Norfolk, and baptized on 4 September 1575. There is no reliable information regarding the name of his wife.

It is now believed that Edward and family were part of the Separatist group who resided in Leyden, Holland. If this is the case, then Edward, wife, and son Samuel would have traveled on the Speedwell from Leyden to Southampton, where they would have boarded the Mayflower. Son Matthew remained behind, not coming to Plymouth until about 1640.

Edward was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. Both Edward and wife succumbed to the general illness which struck the Pilgrims during their first winter at Plymouth. Their son, Samuel, was then taken in by his uncle, the senior Samuel Fuller, also a Mayflower passenger.

Descent from Edward Fuller has been proven through sons Samuel and Matthew.

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Samuel Fuller

Samuel Fuller was born in England, baptized at Redenhall Parish, County of Norfolk, 20 January 1580. He was the son of Robert Fuller and was one of the Separatists who fled from England to Holland in 1609. His first wife, Alice Glascock, died before 1613. He married Agnes Carpenter at Leyden, Holland, 24 April 1613. She died in 1615. He then married Bridget Lee at Leyden 27 May 1617.

Samuel left his wife behind when he came to Plymouth on the Mayflower lower. She and one child, name unknown, came over in 1623 on the Anne; that child died at a young age. A son, Samuel, was born about 1624, and a daughter, Mercy, was born in 1627.

Samuel Fuller was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact.

He was a physician, as well as a deacon of the church at both Leyden and Plymouth.

When Samuel's brother Edward and sister-in-law died during the general illness of the first winter at Plymouth, Edward's son, Samuel, came to live with his uncle Samuel.

The senior Samuel Fuller died at Plymouth during the late summer of 1633, a victim of the infectious epidemic of that year. He was survived by his third wife, Bridget, who died sometime after 1 March 1664.

Descent from Samuel Fuller has been proven through only the son, Samuel.

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Stephen Hopkins

Stephen Hopkins was born at Wortley, Wotton-under-Edge, Gloucestershire, England. As a young man, a weaver, he married his first wife, Constance Dudley. They had three children: Constance, William, and Giles.

In 1608 the family moved to London. Stephen decided to go to Jamestown, Virginia to start a new life for himself and, later, for his family. Three ships left England, but two sank in a hurricane. The third, on which Stephen sailed, became stuck on a coral reef off Bermuda. The passengers went ashore and in the following nine and a half months built two smaller ships to continue the trip to Jamestown. After a few months in Jamestown Stephen returned to England to find his wife, baby, and son, William, had died. Stephen moved to London and became a merchant.

In the spring of 1618 Stephen married his second wife, Elizabeth Fisher. They had one daughter, Damaris. A son, Oceanus, was born on the MAYFLOWER before landing at Plymouth. Both Damaris and Oceanus died young. Five more children were born at Plymouth. Descent from Stephen Hopkins has been proven through only Constance, Giles, the second Damaris, and Deborah.

Stephen was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. He served as an Assistant Governor 1629-32 and 1633-35. He died sometime between 6 June and 17 July 1644. His will and inventory of his estate are on record at Plymouth. His wife died sometime between 1640 and 1644.

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John Howland

John Howland was born in 1592 at Fen Stanton, Huntingdonshire, England. He was the son of Henry Howland. He came aboard the MAYFLOWER listed as a "servant" to John Carver. In midAtlantic, during a storm, Howland was swept overboard, but he caught a topsail halyard which hung over the side and was hauled back on board ship.

About 1624 John Howland married Elizabeth Tilley, also a MAYFLOWER passenger, who had lost her parents during the great sickness that befell the Pilgrims during their first winter at Plymouth.

Descent from John Howland has been proven through all ten of his children. He was one of the 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact.

John Howland was prominent in the public affairs of the Colony, serving several times as an Assistant Governor, and in 1634 was in command of the Pilgrims' trading post on the Kennebec River in Maine. He died on 24 February 1672/3. His will and inventory of estate are on record at Plymouth. His wife Elizabeth died on 21 December 1687 at Swansea.

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Richard More

Richard More was born in England, baptized 13 November 1614 in Shipton Parish, Shropshire. He was the son of Samuel and Catherine More. Richard and three other children were mistreated by their mother, so their father arranged for them to go to America on the Mayflower in care of John Carver, Edward Winslow, and William Brewster. Richard was the only one of the four children to survive that first winter in Plymouth.

He married Christian Hunter on 20 October 1636 and they moved to Salem the following year. There were seven children by this first marriage. He became a sea captain, sailing to England and the West Indies. His first wife died 18 March 1676. He remarried, but nothing is known of this second wife other than her given name, Jane, and the fact that she was the widow of Samuel Crumpton. There were no children by this second marriage.

Richard More died sometime between 19 March 1693/4 and 20 April 1696. According to the prime researcher for the Richard More genealogy contained in the Society's Mayflower Families Volume Two, his age and date of death inscribed on his gravestone at Salem are incorrect.

Descent from Richard More has been proven only through son Richard and daughters Susanne and Christian.

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William Mullins

William Mullins was born in about 1578 in England. His parents were John Molines and Frances Molyneux. He married Alice Atwood, daughter of Nicholas Atwood and Olive Harman. William and Alice both died during the first winter at Plymouth.

William Mullins and Alice Atwood had at least four children: Sarah, Priscilla, Joseph, and William. Joseph died during the first year at Plymouth. Priscilla married John Alden, who also came on the MAYFLOWER, on 12 May 1622 at Plymouth.

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Degory Priest

Degory Priest was born in England about 1579, but nothing has been conclusively established concerning his ancestry or exact location of birth. He joined with the Separatist group that migrated from England to Holland, where he married widow Sarah (Allerton) Vincent, sister of Isaac Allerton, on 4 November 1611. In Leyden, Holland records he was listed as a "hatter of London".

Degory Priest was one of the group that embarked from Holland on the Speedwell and transferred to the Mayflower at Southampton. He left his wife and two children behind. He was one of the fortyone signers of the Mayflower Compact, however he died at Plymouth on 11 January 1621 during the general illness that befell the Pilgrims during that first winter. His wife remarried at Leyden and came to Plymouth on the Anne in 1623 with her two children and second husband. Descent from Degory Priest has been proven through these two children, Mary and Sarah. His wife died at Plymouth before November 1633.

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Thomas Rogers


Thomas Rogers was probably born in England, perhaps about 1587, but nothing conclusive is known about his ancestry or exact place of birth. Similarly, nothing is known of his wife other than her given name, Elsgen, but it is considered likely that she was born in England. Elsgen is Dutch for Elizabeth. The couple was living in Leyden, Holland as of 1618, and it is known that he sold his house in April 1620.

Only Thomas and son Joseph came to Plymouth on the MAYFLOWER. Thomas was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact; however, he did not survive the general sickness that befell the colonists at Plymouth that first winter.

There is no indication that his wife ever came to Plymouth at a later time, but there is clear evidence that more than one of his other children eventually came over, including son John.

Descent from Thomas Rogers has been proven through only sons Joseph and John. Henry Samson was born in London, England. He came over on the MAYFLOWER with Edward Tilley and his wife. He was too young to sign the Mayflower Compact.

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Henry Samson

Henry Samson married Ann Plummer at Plymouth on 6 February 1635. The couple moved to nearby Duxbury where he became a person of standing in the community. Henry died 24 December 1684 at Duxbury. His will and inventory of his estate are on record at Plymouth.

Henry Samson and Ann Plummer had nine children, but descent has been proven through only seven of them: Stephen, James, Caleb, Elizabeth, Hannah, Dorcas, and a daughter (name unknown) who married John Hanmer.

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George Soule


George Soule was born in England, probably between 1593 and 1600. He came over on the MAYFLOWER as a "servant" of Edward Winslow, possibly as a tutor for his children.

George Soule was one of the 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact.

He was married at Plymouth, before 1626, to Mary Becket (or Bucket), who came over on the ANNE in 1623. Nothing is known of her ancestry.

They moved to nearby Duxbury about 1642, and he served as a representative from that community on the Plymouth Colony General Court for many years. Existing land records show that he acquired extensive holdings in the nearby towns of Dartmouth, Middleboro, Marshfield, and Bridgewater; however, he never resided in any of these communities.

George Soule died at Duxbury in 1679. His wife died in December 1676. His will and an inventory of his estate are on record at Plymouth.

There were nine children, but descent from George Soule has been proven through only seven of them: John, Nathaniel, George, Susanna, Mary, Elizabeth, and Patience.

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Myles Standish

Myles Standish was born in England about 1584, either in Lancashire or the Isle of Man. He served in the Holland area as an officer of the English Army and it is believed that this is where he first became acquainted with the Pilgrims. He subsequently joined them as a "hired" military commander when they sailed from England on the MAYFLOWER. With him was his wife, Rose, who died during the general illness that befell the Pilgrims at Plymouth during the first winter.

Myles Standish was one of the 41 signers of The Mayflower Compact.

He was remarried about 1623/4 to Barbara ?, who came over on the ANNE in 1623. There are no known children by the first marriage, but there were seven by the second marriage. Descent from Myles Standish has been proven only through sons Alexander
and Josiah.

Myles Standish was the military leader of the Colony from 1620 until 1656. He was an Assistant Governor from 1631 to 1650, and Treasurer from 1644 to 1649. He became a resident of nearby Duxbury about 1632 and resided there for the remainder of his life. He died on 13 October 1656. His will and inventory of his estate are on record at Plymouth. Barbara died after 16 October 1659.

A tower was erected in Myles' memory in 1872 on land that was part of his original Duxbury home.

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Richard Warren

It is believed that Richard Warren was born about 1578 in England, but nothing has been conclusively established concerning his ancestry or the exact location of his birth. He married prior to 1610. We know only his wife's first name, Elizabeth.

When Richard Warren sailed on the MAYFLOWER from Southampton he left his wife and five daughters, Mary, Anna, Sarah, Elizabeth, and Abigail behind. They all came to Plymouth on the ANNE in 1623.

Richard Warren was one of the 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact. He was accorded the title of "Mr" which was used in those times to distinguish someone because of birth or achievement. Similarly, his wife was called "Mrs" over the years, when most women were simply called "goodwife."

They had a total of seven children, the last two being sons, Nathaniel and Joseph, born at Plymouth. Descent from Richard Warren has been proven through all of the children.

Richard Warren died in 1628 after a long illness. Elizabeth survived him by forty-five years, being prosperous in her own right, apparently through wise land management, and without remarrying. She died 2 October 1673, over 90 years old.

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William White


William White was one of the 41 signers of the Mayflower Compact. Susanna, his wife, and their son, Resolved, were on the MAYFLOWER. A second son, Peregrine, was born on board the MAYFLOWER while it was at anchor in December, 1620. The family brought a cradle along with them. It is now on display at Pilgrim Hall in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

William White died in February, 1621, during the general sickness of the first winter at Plymouth. In May of that year Susanna married Edward Winslow, a MAYFLOWER passenger who had lost his wife a few weeks before.

Descent from William White has been proven through sons Resolved and Peregrine.

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Edward Winslow

Edward Winslow was born at Droitwich, Worcestershire, England on 28 October 1595. He was the son of Edward and Magdalene (Oliver) Winslow. In 1617 he joined the Separatist group at Leyden, Holland. Here he married Elizabeth Barker 16 May 1618. He was a printer at that time. Edward and wife were among the group that embarked from Holland on the Speedwell and transferred to the Mayflower at Southampton.

He was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact.

His wife died early in 1621 during the general illness that befell the Pilgrims at Plymouth that first winter. He married widow Susanna (Fuller) White, also a Mayflower passenger, on 12 May 1621, and they had four children. Descent from Edward Winslow has been proven through two of these children, Josiah and Elizabeth.

Edward became prominent in Colony affairs: He was second only to Capt. Myles Standish in importance in dealing with the Indians; he made numerous trips to England on Colony business; he was an Assistant Governor many times over the years, and Governor in 1633, 1636, and 1644. His portrait in the gallery of Pilgrim Hall in Plymouth is the only authentic portrait of any of the Mayflower passengers. Edward died at sea, in the West Indies, on 18 May 1655.

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